Trip Report: Heading home on Brussels Airlines Business Class CDG-BRU-IAD

Now that we’ve been back from our Seychelles and France trip for a full three calendar months, it seems to be the appropriate time for the final blog post on the trip – our flights back on Brussels Airlines from Paris to Brussels to Washington Dulles. We leave for Israel in two days, and I promise those blogs (to the extent I do any) won’t be as tardy.

As a recap since it’s been awhile, we used US Airways miles for one ticket, and United miles for the other – the last chance to use US Airways miles on Star Alliance and the last chance to use United for partner business travel without paying a bazillion miles. Our award routing was IAD-ADD-SEZ on Ethiopian, SEZ-ADD-CDG on Ethiopian, and CDG-BRU-IAD on Brussels.

People seemed to be more surprised that we were connecting through Brussels to get back home than they were surprised by our Ethiopian flights. But there were only two options with two seats on dates that worked for us, Brussels via Brussels or Lufthansa via Frankfurt. Not only is Frankfurt more out of the way than Brussels, but Brussels Airlines business class has a much better reputation. I can confidently say we made the right choice.

It took us about 7 minutes to walk from the Park Hyatt to the RoissyBus in the Opera area of Paris, where we had just missed a bus. But the buses run every fifteen minutes, so itwasn’t a big deal. I’ve taken the bus before and it is really easy from that part of town. <http://www.youwentwhere.com/?p=1034> It was a 10,50 euros (tickets on machine or on bus) 35 minute ride, as we were going on a Sunday morning and went to the first stop, Terminal 1.

Terminal 1 at Charles DeGaulle is right out of the Jetsons, a large round building, disconnected from the rest of the airport,with many levels and tubes of stairs and walkways. It is also a giant pain in the butt, which I’d experienced when I flew out of T1 on Lufthansa last year.  Brussels Airlines check-in is downstairs, near baggage claim. There was no wait, but it was the only time on the whole trip where carry-ons were weighed and tagged. We then headed back to the entry level, and then through a long series of tubes leading to the gates. Each “pier” (more like a spoke) at T1 has 4-6 gates, and its own security (and lounges). Our pier only handled Schengen area flights, so there was no immigration. Even though we were flying Business Class, we weren’t given “Priority No. 1” passes at check-in, so couldn’t use the priority lane, but the wait was only about 3-4 minutes and we had time.IMG_0992 IMG_0991

The pier was pretty crowded, as it is shared by five Star Alliance carriers – including SAS, LOT, Aegean, and Swiss – making for a motley crew of passengers. The one lounge is operated by SAS, and it really wasn’t anything special, though Ikea-like. It was clean, with an adequate continental cold breakfast spread and some snacks. The free wifi worked alright. The wall of windows, though, made the lounge unbearably hot. There also wasn’t a bathroom in the lounge, so we didn’t end up staying too long.

SAS Lounge at CDG

SAS Lounge at CDG

IMG_0998 IMG_0999 IMG_1000

Our flight to Brussels boarded about fifteen minutes behind schedule. The passenger mix seemed a mix of Brussels-bound passengers that had originated in the US and Canada on United and Air Canada, and Francophone Africa-bound passengers originating in Paris.

Our plane

Our plane

The plane was set up for only three rows in business class. Oddly, when I had called Brussels Airlines for seat assignments, the agent told me the middle seats were not blocked off in business, and that we had to take a middle seat if we wanted to sit together. I knew that wasn’t right, so just took an aisle and a window. Sure enough, at boarding, all of the middle seats were indeed blocked.

Short-haul Brussels Business

Short-haul Brussels Business

The seats were the same slim-line seats as on our Air France flight from MPL to ORY, with tiny tray tables and little padding, and what seemed to be even less legroom. Unfortunately for my boyfriend, a woman sat in front of him (in the bulkhead row), and proceeded to recline her seat the entire way – as soon as she boarded. While I agree that technically you have the right to recline your seat, to do so before taxiing, when you will just have to lift it up again, and when you have your own row in a bulkhead, is just rude. She ended up moving before take off to the other side of the plane, and, naturally did not lift the seat up when she did. Better him than me, though, as I am the long-legged one in our relationship.

Oh, hi.

Oh, hi.

The flight attendants distributed orange juice and water predeparture, along with magazines and newspapers. It took us a long time to get moving from the gate for some reason– enough that I read an entire Belgian auto magazine. (Okay, by “read”, I meant looked at the pictures.) But once we hit the taxi, we were in the air.

As soon as the captain turned off the seatbelt sign, the flight attendants leapt into action- necessary as they did a meal service on the 40 minute flight. First came hot towels, then about 2 minutes later, a tray with a skewer of shrimp, a half-scallop, and some vegetables, an open faced small beef sandwich with Indian spices, and a “dessert” skewer with fruit and cheese. The tray also included a small box of Neuhaus truffles. About 40 seconds later, we were offered beverages, then 2 minutes later coffee, and a minute after that a basket of Neuhaus chocolates. Amazingly, there also seemed to be a complimentary snack service in coach, which looked like a small sandwich. Brussels typically charges for food in European coach on most of its fares but I think due to limited catering at Paris, they just give the sandwich and juice for free. Shortly after trays were cleared, we were descending into Brussels.

CDG-BRU Business meal

CDG-BRU Business meal

It was a loooooong walk from the A-gates where we arrived at BRU to the B-gates where we were departing from. The airport seemed way too big for the number of people there, as we went up and down multiple escalators and walkways, and made close to a full circle. When we finally reached the B-gates, our boarding passes scanned to let us into the “Fast Lane,” but it didn’t save us much time. After the ID check, the lines merge, and although the x-ray belt said “Priority for Fast Lane,” two women pushed in front of us who didn’t understand the 8-language sign explaining what needed to come out of their bags.IMG_1007

Wandering through BRU

Wandering through BRU

We made it to the Brussels Airlines Lounge which, though larger than the SAS lounge in Paris, was still pretty small. Most of the food was in a supermarket style display case- sandwiches, cheese, salami, and olives. There was also a beef soup, and when we were finishing up, they brought out cherry cheesecake. The highlight of the lounge though is the large display of beers, Belgium’s specialty. As with the SAS lounge, there was no bathroom in the lounge. In lieu of a dedicated wifi, they provided slips for 1 hr of free wifi on the main airport network (good for one device). The lounge was decently crowded, as there were a few departing flights to the UK, in addition to the Washington-bound flight.IMG_1013 IMG_1012 IMG_1011 IMG_1009 IMG_1010

We headed to the gate about 10 minutes before scheduled boarding, and reached a dead area of BRU’s B gates; of what seemed like a dozen gates, only two had planes at them – our Brussels Airlines’ A330 to Washington and a Qatar Airways 787 to Doha. About 20 minutes after scheduled boarding time, with no previous announcement, boarding was announced all at once. There were two lines, each with a security employee, and alas the one working the business class line was particularly slow. The two lines merged as we boarded in unison. I’ll say the ground experience in BRU was not so impressive, but the flight experience was a different story.

Our friend Ethiopian, which spends the day at BRU after concluding ADD-CDG-BRU

Our friend Ethiopian, which spends the day at BRU after concluding ADD-CDG-BRU

The Brussels A330 has the same seats and configuration as the Austrian Airlines flight I took in the summer to start my Croatia trip. The seats are new and lie-flat in 1-2-1, 2-1-2 alternating configuration. They feature two USB ports and one regular power outlet, and a few small storage pockets. On my Austrian trip, I was in one of the solo seats, which wasn’t super comfortable for the overnight flight due to the narrowness of the foot well. The double seats are counterintuitively a bit wider, and I wasn’t anticipating any problems on the day flight.IMG_1018 IMG_1025

Cabin shots, Brussels A330 Business

Cabin shots, Brussels A330 Business

The business cabin was about 60% full. Pre-departure, the flight attendants served orange juice, Kir, champagne, and water. After takeoff, we were handed headsets and amenity kits. The amenity kits looked nice on the outside, and were a highly reusable shape, but they were pretty weak on the inside, containing only plain black socks, a plain eyemask, a toothbrush, lip balm, earplugs, and a surprisingly large-sized toothpaste.

Brussels Airlines amenity kit

Brussels Airlines amenity kit

The large inflight entertainment screen is basically a big iPad, and had a decent number of new movies and TV shows available. As inflight service started, I booted up “Gravity.” Menus were distributed, though no hot towels, as well as large bottles of mineral water.

Brussels Airlines IFE

Brussels Airlines IFE

First up was a drink service, along with nuts and an amuse bouche of smoked salmon and a foie gras brochette. It was unremarkable. All drinks and food selections were served off carts in the aisle.

Amusing my bouche

Amusing my bouche

For the next course, there was a choice of “parmesan panna cotta” with beef, or shrimp. We went with the panna cotta, which was the designated “star chef” selection. It was odd, and a lot of cheese. The little pesto mozzarella balls and tomatoes were best, and we both independently combined it with the small greens and snap peas salad served at the same time. The presentation was nice, but my lettuce was a little brown.

Brussels Business starters

Brussels Business starters

As entrees, the choices were veal, salmon, or cheese tortellini. We both had the veal which, though resembling a coach meal in its presentation, was tasty and garnished with fresh parsley tableside, served along side some boiled potatoes and some mushy, well-seasoned vegetables.

Brussels Airlines Business Class Veal

Brussels Airlines Business Class Veal

We skipped the cheese course, and went to dessert, a chocolate mousse that looked a lot better than it tasted. Later, a flight attendant came around with a small box of 4 Neuhaus pralines. There was also a setup of fruit, juice, liqueurs and champagne in the front of the cabin, reminiscent of Lufthansa. There seemed to be a special junior flight attendant who had no job but to set up this display and bring out coffees.IMG_1035 IMG_1038

Overall, the service was super-friendly, and the flight attendant working our row was very nice. At one point my boyfriend very loudly laughed as he was watching “Identity Thief,” and she smiled and talked to us about how funny she found Melissa McCarthy.

After lunch, I watched an old episode of “The New Adventures of Old Christine” (I’m a sucker for Julia Louis-Dreyfus), and then switched to “Inside Llewyn Davis.” The flight had gotten pretty turbulent and my coffee was spilling all over the place. I couldn’t get into the movie, so I turned it off and just relaxed. Once the flight calmed down, I did some photo editing, and with about 4 hours left in flight, Jules Destrooper stroopwafel flavored ice cream was served. Deeeeelicious.

NOM

NOM

Around this point, we discovered that we both had felt like our seats had been growing firmer and less firm randomly throughout the flight. Huh. About 75 minutes before landing, we were served a snack of a Morccoan stew over couscous, along with some fruit, which was tasty

Brussels Business Snack

Brussels Business Snack

Just prior to landing, the Flight Attendant came around and gave each business class passenger a large red gift bag with a box of 20 Neuhaus pralines, and a card thanking us for flying Brussels. I don’t know if this gift is distributed on all Brussels longhaul flights, but it was definitely nice!IMG_1042

The nonstop service to Dulles was pretty new, and I would be shocked if it continues at the same frequency in the winter next year. Whereas business class was about 60% full, coach was less than 25% full. When I went back to take a peek, it felt like I was in “The Langoliers.”

Commemorative route poster in the Brussels Lounge

Commemorative route poster in the Brussels Lounge

Of all the transatlantic business flights I’ve flown, I’d rank Brussels pretty highly – probably just a bit above Delta, exceeding Lufthansa and Ethiopian, a bit below Alitalia and Aeroflot, and comparable to Austrian. If it weren’t for the massive devaluation of United miles for partner travel, given their new nonstop service into Dulles, I could imagine myself using them quite frequently.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.